esllistening.org/eslreading.org

Website Review: esllistening.org/eslreading.org

In short: Some great materials. The best parts are the stories. You can read, listen, and read simple versions. They are written by Kieran McGovern and he is very talented. You can learn more about him here.

Though the site design has improved recently, there are still broken links. Sometimes, the site is confusing. Most links open in a new window, so if you browse the site, you need to close a lot of windows.

For students: Check out the podcasts page for an excellent collection of listening materials.

For teachers: Click on the “reading” tab on eslreading.org to learn all about choosing ESL books (readers) for your classes. You can also read an article about writing readers.

eslplans.com

Website Review: eslplans.com

In short: As of today there are 200 plans on this cool site. Some are simple fill-in-the-blank worksheets and others are more detailed and exciting activities. All the plans are submitted by users. There’s a nice community feel to the site. Everything is excellently organized and super easy to use. Refreshingly few ads and no clutter at all really create a nice experience.

For teachers: This site is a great idea, but still feels a little empty. Why not submit one of your plans and encourage those around you to do the same. If this site goes viral, everyone wins.

tefltunes.com

Website Review: tefltunes.com

In short: £10GBP (~$15) gets you a one-year subscription to lesson plans built around songs. As of today, there are 42 plans on the site, 8 of those are free. The free ones are certainly great plans that will ensure exciting, memorable, and educational lessons. The site is well organized and easy to use.

For students: If you want to find some songs to help you improve your English, this is a great place to go. You can search for songs using level, theme, task, or artist. You’ll need to study them by yourself, though.

For teachers: Consider asking your school to pay the £20GBP (~$30) so everyone at your school can use these great materials.

Use Google to Study Vocabulary

Using Google To Learn Vocabulary

Students, how do you study vocabulary? Most students have lists of words that they study. Often, they try to memorize the translation. This isn’t bad, but sometimes it’s hard to remember the new words. If you can connect the new words with something, then it’s easier to remember them. For example, if you learn a new word and see a funny picture at the same time, then your brain has two memories: the word and the funny picture. That’s why you’re more likely to remember the word.

So, how can you create connections? One great way is to use Google. Do a Google search for the word you want to learn. First, you get a definition of the word. You can also see (1) websites that use the word, (2) pictures of the word, (3) videos of the word, and more.

Here’s a new word: Strenuous. Click on the links below to see the Google searches for this word. Can you guess what it means?

Regular Search

Image Search

Video Search

News Search

Shopping Search

Pretty cool, right? ;) (~^)

joongangdaily.joins.com

Website Review: joongangdaily.joins.com

In short: A great English news site for upper-intermediate or advanced level Koreans. Many of the stories are in English and Korean, so Koreans can quickly check the translation. Even if you’re not Korean, though, you’ll enjoy reading these stories on everything from current events to entertainment. You can also listen to many of them.

For students (in Korea): Check out the Foreign Community tab where you can find many English language events. There are many nice opportunities to go practice your English in the real world.

For teachers: Assign one of the stories that have audio to your students. Ask them to read it for the next class. They can print it off, but should be familiar with the intonation, timing, and word stress while reading.

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