Global Marketing Tuesday

Watch

On YouTube

YouTubeLink

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Guerilla marketing: This is low-cost, not normal product promotion. Examples include flash mobs and graffiti.

For our guerrilla marketing campaign, we had people sleep outside in January in the middle of the city to show how warm our sleeping bags are.

(2) Promotions: The part of marketing that lets people know about a product and its value.

Our product is great. The price is right. And we’re selling it in stores everywhere. Now let’s promote it with some television advertising.

(3) Buzz: Excitement for something.

The buzz about the new song is really great. I’m excited to listen to it.

Today’s

Questions

1. What do you need to open a Molson beer fridge?

a. A friend from Canada

b. A promotional code

c. A Canadian passport

2. Why did Molson make this campaign?

a. To save money

b. To build buzz

c. To get drunk

3. What emotions does Molsen want associated with Canada?

a. Cool and fun

b. Sexy and dangerous

c. Nerdy but nice

7 ________________________

GLOBAL MARKETING TUESDAY

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By Jeremy Schaar

Three words: Guerrilla. Beer. Marketing.

Guerrilla is usually associated with war. It’s soldiers fighting outside of a normal army.

Let’s call beer a fizzy drink that helps us relax.

Marketing is about showing the value of a product.

What do they have in common? That’s what you’ll learn today. You’ll also learn some vocabulary that will help you on the job.

Molson is a Canadian beer. They recently had a really cool guerrilla marketing campaign. (See above.)

The campaign was this: They put refrigerators full of beer all around Europe. To open the fridge, you needed a Canadian passport. Then, they filmed everything and made an awesome YouTube video. We can see excited crowds looking for a Canadian and then parties on the street after a Canadian arrives. Great idea, right?

Why would a company like Molson choose a guerrilla marketing campaign like this? Why not just buy television commercials and advertisements in magazines? First they probably did buy television commercials and advertisements in magazines. But guerrilla marketing can do more. It can create buzz.

Buzz is a little difficult to explain, but basically it’s when people are excited about something. They’re talking about it, telling their friends, spreading information.

In the case of Molson, they created buzz for their beer. Over 1,000,000 people have watched their video on YouTube. Thousands have shared it with their friends. In connection with a series of other videos, they’re creating a feeling about Canada, Canadians, and their beer.

The feeling is that Canada is cool. Canadians are a little crazy. If you drink the beer, you’ll have cool, crazy experience. The video really shows this. Only after a Canadian arrives does the party begin.

At the same time, when people are talking about the product, they’re sharing an important part of the brand–that it’s Canadian. Most people didn’t know this before, but now? Now they do. And how.

Got questions or comments? How about practicing some new vocabulary and posting your thoughts on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter?

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

C, B, A

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Supply Chain Wednesday

Watch

On YouTube

YouTubeLink

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Breakthrough: A sudden solution to a problem.

After two years, I had a breakthrough and finally figured out the ending to my book.

(2) Robot: A machine that does things automatically.

Robots have replaced many blue collar workers. Are office workers next?

(3) Approach: A style or a way.

We didn’t find good employees with our usual approach, so we advertised in new places.

Today’s

Questions

1. Which company doesn’t own a big warehouse?

a. Amazon

b. UPS

c. Twitter

2. What will the video be about?

a. Receiving stuff in a warehouse

b. Moving stuff inside a warehouse

c. Shipping stuff out of a warehouse

3. What does it mean to manage inventory?

a. Organize the things a company owns

b. Hire, fire, etc.

c. Purchase goods for sale later

7 ________________________

SUPPLY CHAIN WEDNESDAY

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By Jeremy Schaar

Mike Mountz–Let the Inventory Walk and Talk (Part 2)

Today’s lesson is about a TED video by Mike Mountz. He describes how things get into boxes at a warehouse. You’ll learn lots of good vocabulary and be able to understand the warehouse part of the supply chain better. Actually, last week, I presented the same video, but I just introduced a lot of vocabulary. We’ll review some vocabulary today, but if you didn’t see last week’s lesson, please click this link to check it out. You’ll need it to understand the video.

One other thing, for this week, just watch the video from 0:00 to 1:50. The video is quite long and might be hard to understand, so let’s go slow. I promise if you continue to study with Stuart Mill English, we’ll get through the whole thing.

OK, let’s get into the video. He begins by announcing his subject: “a breakthrough approach for managing items of inventory inside a warehouse…a pick, pack, and ship setting.” What does this mean?

A warehouse is a place a company uses to keep their stuff. A company like Amazon has lots of warehouses where they keep all the things they sell. Some companies don’t have any warehouse because they don’t have any goods to sell.

Managing the inventory just means organizing the things the company owns–moving them around, receiving them, and sending them out of the warehouse.

So, we can expect to hear a cool way of doing this. He says the answer will include robots.

In the first two minutes, Mike Mountz describes a person ordering a red t-shirt, some green pants, and blue shoes online. The person receives their package. He then asks a question:

“Did you ever stop to think about how those items of inventory actually found their way inside that box in the warehouse?”

This is an interesting question and very important for supply chain management. How do companies send things to customers? What’s the best way to do it?

For today’s lesson, I also created a quiz on TedEd. That’s a great website for studying online videos. Click here to check the quiz for more practice.

Got questions or comments? How about practicing some new vocabulary and posting your thoughts on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter?

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

C, B, A

——————————————

You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Supply Chain Wednesday

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Warehouse: A place a company uses to keep things.

We try to keep inventory in our warehouse as low as possible.

(2) Goo: Supply Chain Management slang for goods or products.

We make sure people can get their goo in just one business day.

(3) Pick-pack worker: Someone who works in a warehouse and assembles packages.

Robots are taking the jobs of lots of pick-pack workers. Is it a good thing?

Today’s

Questions

1. What is this video about?

a. How robots are used to make warehouses more efficient.

b. How robots are destroying jobs.

c. How robots are creating jobs.

2. What example does he give at the beginning of the video?

a. A person ordering some clothes online.

b. A new kind of company.

c. How big warehouses have become.

3. What did his old company try to do?

a. Deliver clothes.

b. Deliver groceries.

c. Deliver car parts.

7________________________

Supply Chain Wednesday

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By Jeremy Schaar

Mike Mountz–Let the Inventory Walk and Talk (Part 1)

Have you ordered things online? Have you thought about what happens after you make your order? Is it magic? How does your stuff to get to your house?

Well, in this video, Mick Mountz makes the magic disappear and explains how robots move things around the building so workers can stay in one place.

It’s not too hard to understand, but there’s a lot of vocabulary that you might not know. In this lesson, I’ll explain lots of words. They’re all from the first two minutes of the video! That’s be enough for today. In a future lesson, we’ll look at the video in more detail.

  1. Pick: To choose an item. In the video, workers pick items and put them in boxes.
  2. Package: To put an item in a box.
  3. Ship: To send something. After items are picked and packaged, they’re shipped to customers.
  4. Pick, package, ship setting: A place where items are organized for delivery. For example, Amazon.com has many places where items are collected and sent.
  5. Mobile robots: Machines that can move. Mobile robots are used instead of humans. Instead of humans walking around to get stuff, mobile robots take things to the humans.
  6. Warehouse: A place a company uses to keep things.
  7. To assemble: To put something together. To assemble an order means to put all the parts of an order together.
  8. Order: Something a customer wants. An order of french fries at McDonalds costs about $1.
  9. To submit: To send information. If you submit an order, you tell the company you want something from them.
  10. Goo: Supply Chain Management slang for goods or products.
  11. Inventory: The stuff a company has in a warehouse. The things it owns and plans to use or sell.
  12. Pick-pack worker: Someone who works in a warehouse and assembles packages.
  13. Distribution: Sending stuff around. Companies with lots of stuff need to distribute it to customers. This can, for example, be done with a store or by mail.
  14. Order fulfillment: (noun) The act of sending a customer the things they want
  15. To fill an order: (verb) The act of sending a customer the things they want

Want more practice? Got questions? Comment on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter.

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

A, A, B

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Business Strategy Monday

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Ignite: To start a fire or start something else

The new product ignited growth at our company.

(2) Work processes: The way we work

GM Motors changed their work processes to be more similar to Toyota.

(3) To Soar: To go very high.

Some birds soar above lakes and look for fish to eat.

Just because our profits are soaring now, doesn’t mean they will always be this high.

Today’s

Questions

1. What happened to productivity after factory managers got electricity?

a. It increased right away.

b. It increased after 5 years.

c. It increased after 30 years.

2. What’s an example of a general purpose technology?

a. Electricity

b. Steam Engine

c. Computers

d. All of the above

3. What does he say is stagnating?

a. Jobs

b. Productivity

c. Innovation

7________________________

BUSINESS STRATEGY MONDAY

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Want some more questions? Today’s lesson is also on TedEd: http://ed.ted.com/on/9ZHAUrbR

By Jeremy Schaar

In today’s lesson we’ll look at a TED Video. Erik Brynjolfsson (brin-JOLF-son??) feels that for the world to keep growing, we need to grow with machines. What does this mean? Well, it means that we need to use computers and our brains together in order to grow fast. For example, who do you think is the best chess player: A great chess program? A great chess player? A player and a program working together? Obviously, the answer is the player and program working together.

Erik argues that productivity and growth are both growing fast because of computers. However, we aren’t using computers well. The same thing happened after the world first got electricity. It took 30 years for managers to use electricity to really increase productivity. All general purpose technologies–electricity, the steam engine, computers–have lots of other good stuff that comes with them, but it takes time. The light bulb couldn’t exist without electricity, but it took time to invent it.

In our current world, we aren’t creating enough jobs, so we need to figure out how to do that.

For managers, the question is whether they’re really using computer technology well. Are they really increasing your productivity? If not, why not? Most companies still don’t have CTOs (Chief Technology Officers) who can fight for technology things at the top level.

What do you think? Are companies using technology like computers well? Should humans work with technology more? Will computers eventually take all our jobs?

That’s a lot to think about. How about practicing some new vocabulary and posting your thoughts on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter?

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

C, D, A

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Corporate Titles and Organization Charts

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Corporate Titles and Organization Charts

Many Business English students ask about titles. For example: What’s the difference between a Senior Manager and a Vice-President? What do General Mangers do exactly? How do companies use titles differently? Trying to translate titles between English and another language can be quite tricky.

But a lesson on the topic can easily solve the problems. Here are several resources you can use and then some follow-up questions.

For starters… Wikipedia’s article on corporate titles is a good place to start. You’ll find a list of over 70 titles and descriptions of what the people do.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corporate_title

Check out some org charts… You can find links to thousands of org charts on the internet. Just do a search for “org charts” or “organization charts”. Here are a few links, anyway. Look at them with your students and discuss how they are similar or different to each other. Also, which titles do you see?

Here’s one.

And another.

And one more.

How about a joke? Follow this link for a funny cartoon. Ask your students why it’s funny?

And an article to read… Finally, about.com has a nice article about org charts. It briefly talks about charts, titles, and the purposes behind them. You can use it as a starting point for a discussion.

http://management.about.com/cs/generalmanagement/a/OrgCharts.htm

Here are some discussion questions you might ask your students:

  • What’s the purpose of an organization chart?
  • Do small companies need organization charts too?
  • At what size does a company probably need a chart?
  • How might a manager use a chart to increase productivity?
  • How might an unclear chart hurt productivity?
  • Which titles do all org charts need? Which titles are specific to certain companies?
  • What’s your dream title? Why?

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