Currently Browsing: Speaking

Saturday Listening Lesson–Designing For Five Senses and Speaking Practice

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Intonation: The way your voice goes up and down while you speak.

In English, rising intonation can create a question..

(2) Word Stress: How loud and long you say something.

You need to give word stress to the important words.

(3) Timing: The speed you say different things and the pauses in your speech.

Timing is very important when singing or telling a joke.

Today’s

Questions

1. What is this video about?

a. Prosody

b. Word stress, timing, and intonation

c. Using five senses in design

2. Why is it hard to understand these phrases?

a. People say them quickly

b. People don’t use the same intonation

c. They have hard vocabulary

3. Why are non-native speakers hard to understand?

a. They have bad grammar

b. They use different intonation, word stress, and timing

c. They use strange words

7________________________

Saturday Listening Lesson

________________________

By Jeremy Schaar

Today’s Saturday listening lesson is on an easy idea. Jinsop Lee says that most design focuses on sight and touch. But these are only two of the five sense. He suggests that designers should start thinking about sound, taste, and smell. Good idea, right?

He makes a chart to show this and I think you’ll easily understand the video.

It’s also a good idea for anyone who makes or markets a product.

For you improving your listening, let’s focus on a few phrases that are simple, but difficult to understand.

:30 Let me tell you about: This is used before presenting an idea

2:30 To do this: This is used before explain how to do something

4:15 I used to: This is used to talk about some past action

4:50 It’s because of the: This is used to explain why something is true

These phrases are easy to understand when you read them, but hard to understand when you hear them. They’re hard because native speakers say them so quickly. We push the words together. Watch these videos to understand. You’ll hear me say the expressions above and then hear Jinsop say them in the video.

While you listen, notice my intonation pattern is similar, but the timing and word stress are different.

For your practice, you need to do two things.

(1) When you’re listening to someone speak, notice the way they say the words.

(2) Practice speaking like Jinsop. If you can speak like him, then you can understand him.

Non-native speakers are really hard to understand when their intonation, timing, or word stress is different, so work hard to make sure yours sounds like a native speaker.

So, how well did you understand? As always, if you have any questions or want more practice, comment on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter.

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

C, A, B

——————————————

You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Talking about Technology

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Technology

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to technology

Materials: Six devices (for example, iPod, cell phone, remote control, camera, laptop, toaster, GPS, etc. They can be anything.) A computer with an internet connection would also help for the last activity.

Grammar: Imperatives, present simple questions

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

How’s that work? Say this when you want to understand how something happens.
What’s that do? Say this when you want to understand what something does.
First, you should… Say this to explain how to start doing something.
Next, you should… Say these to explain the middle steps of a process.
Now, you have to…
Then, you…
Finally, you… Say this to explain how to finish a process.
First, you should get some bread. Say these to explain how to make toast
Next, you should put the bread in the toaster.
Now, you have to wait a minute or two.
Then, you take the toast out of the toaster.
Finally, you put butter on the toast and enjoy!

Vocabulary: device, first, next, now, then, finally

Vocabulary Practice Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Your Devices Look at your six devices. Answer the following questions about each device:

  • Why do people like it?
  • Is it popular?
  • Could you live without it?
  • How often do you use it?
  • Do your parents use it too?

Describe how to use things Think of three devices. Write directions for how to use them (follow the toaster example). Share your directions with your partner

Answer Questions Discuss the following technology questions

Is technology important to you?

What are the most important technologies in the world?

Do you like learning how to use new things?

Do your parents like learning how to use new things?

Are people who play video games better with new technology? Why?

Are you good at explaining how to use technological devices?

Your Questions Now write five technology questions of your own. Discuss them with your partner

Web/Field Trip Go to a website or a store with lots of technological devices. Find ten things you want to buy and explain why you want to buy them

Talking about Future Travel

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Future Travel

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss future travel.

Materials: A computer with an internet connection; Pictures of these things (from a magazine or on the internet): A fork, a car, a toilet, a skirt, a tree, a soccer ball, and a cigarette

Grammar: Future Modals

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I’d love to go there. Say these about places that you want to visit
I think that’s the most beautiful place in the world.
It looks like paradise.
I think it’d be better to avoid that place. Say these about places that you don’t want to visit.
I heard bad things about it.
It’s not high on my list of places to go.
I’d love to live there. Say these about places that you want to live.
I could make a home there.

Vocabulary: Paradise, Island, Museum, To go skiing, To go hiking, To go swimming, beach, site seeing

Google the Vocab Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Controlled Activity Search YouTube for these countries and the word “travel”: Thailand, North Korea, France, Russia, Columbia, Canada.  Watch a video. Answer these questions:

What do you see?

Would you like to visit this country? Why/Why not?

Question Time Ask your partner these questions.

If you had $100,000,000, which countries would you visit?

Which countries would you like to live in?

Could you live in a country where you don’t speak the language?

Which languages would you like to learn?

What things do you like to do on vacation?

Would you prefer to visit museums or sit on a beach?

Would you prefer to sit on a beach or go skiing?

Would you prefer to go skiing or go shopping?

Do you like camping?

Your Questions Now write five discussion questions and ask your partner.

Same or different? Write the names of five countries. Then look at pictures of these things and answer the questions below

A fork: Do people eat the same in your five countries? Do they use forks? How do they eat?

A car: Do people drive a lot in your five countries? How do people normally travel inside a city? How do they travel between cities?

A toilet: Do most people use a toilet in your five countries? Are toilets necessary?

A skirt: How do people dress in your five countries? Are short skirts OK? Why/why not?

A tree: Describe the nature in your five countries. Are there mountains? Oceans? Beaches? Where do you think people go on vacation?

A soccer ball: What are the most popular sports in your five countries? Do you like those sports?

A cigarette: Do a lot of people smoke in your five countries? Is it OK to smoke in bars and restaurants?

Watch a Movie Find a movie about travel and watch it with your partner. Here are some good choices.

National Lampoons European Vacation (Comedy)

Earth (Documentary)

Elizabethtown (Romantic Comedy)

Talking about Sports

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Sports

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss sports.

Materials: A computer with an internet connection

Grammar: Present Simple, Verbs + Gerunds and Verbs + Infinitives

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I’m really competitive. Say these if winning is really important to you.
I play to win.
I can’t stand losing.
I just like to have a good time. Say these if winning isn’t really important to you.
I don’t like to take games too seriously.
It’s just a game!
It was over before it began. Say these when a team is easily winning.
They’re dominating.
They’re getting their butts kicked. Say this about a team that is losing badly.
Don’t give up! Say this to someone who should keep trying.
What an exciting match! Say this when you are enjoying watching a match.

Vocabulary: team, competitive, match, dominate, to give up

Vocabulary Practice Go to Sport Illustrated’s website and look at the pictures. Find a picture of something that shows a team; something that shows competition, something that shows match; something that shows dominate; and something that shows to give up

Discussion Questions Discuss these questions about sports with your partner.

Do you like to watch sports? Why? What do you like to watch?

Do you like to play sports? Why? What do you like to play?

Is winning very important to you? Why/Why not?

Do you like to play other games (like chess)? Which games do you like to play OR Why don’t you like to play games?

Is it important for children to play sports? Why/Why not?

Which sport is better for children: soccer or baseball?

Strange Sports Do a Google image search for these sports. Describe them to your partner. Would you like to try playing them?

  • Curling
  • Midget Throwing
  • Bog Snorkeling
  • Underwater Rugby
  • Sumo Wrestling
  • Lawn Mower Racing

Your Questions Write five discussion questions about sports. Ask your partner your questions.

Next Why not ask your classmates to play a sport together. You could make one of the rules that you have to speak English. Anyone who doesn’t speak English gets a penalty.

Talking about Money

This is another speaking topic for students. Click here to read the introduction to the series.

Students, remember, you can only speak English while you do this activity. Don’t speak your native language for at least one hour. You can do it!

Teachers, you can adapt these for lessons, or give them as homework.

Topic: Money

Objectives: After the discussion, you should be able to discuss money.

Materials: none

Expressions

Listen and repeat these expressions.

I mostly spend money on food. Say this to describe how you spend your money. We chose “food” but you can say any noun.
I need to get some cash. Say when you need to find an ATM/Cashpoint/Bank Machine.
I found a great deal. Say after you found something for a cheap price.
I’m broke. Say when you don’t have money.
I’m dead broke. Say when you really, really don’t have money.
That’s way too expensive. Say after you see something with a very high price.
That’s a great deal. Say after you see something with a very low price.
I need to save up some money for that. Say when you want to buy something after you have more money.
I went on a bit of a spending spree. Say when you spent a lot of money on different things.

Vocabulary: cash, broke, dead broke, deal, spending spree

Vocab Activity: Do a Google image search for each word and discuss the pictures with your partner. (You can also draw pictures of each word and discuss the pictures with your partner.)

Makes lists Write a list of ten things you have bought recently.

Ask your partner the following questions about each item (example answers are in italics):

What is the first thing on your list? The first thing I bought was soap.

Why did you buy it? We didn’t have any more soap at home.

Was it a good deal? Yes. It was a great deal! I only paid fifty cents. / No, it was way too expensive.

Are you glad you bought it? Yes!

Why/Why not? I like being clean!

Question Time: Now ask your partner these questions:

What do you usually spend money on?

Do you usually find good deals?

What is the most expensive thing you ever bought?

What are three expensive things you want to buy in the next five years?

Do you like spending money? How do you feel when you buy things?

Do people save a lot of money in your country? Do people spend too much money in your country?

Do your parents and you feel the same about money? How are different generations different?

Your Questions: Write five discussion questions about money. Ask your partner your questions.

YouTube Money Videos Search YouTube for the following songs and discuss which one you like the most and why.

“Money for Nothing” by The Dire Straights

“Money” by The Beatles

“Money” by Pink Floyd

« Previous Entries