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Personal Growth Sundays: Game Dynamics

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Dynamic: A force, an energy, a motivator, a cause for action

As the economy improves, the dynamics of the market are changing. We should be ready to invest in new companies.

(2) Reward: A positive thing you get for some action

You guys all did a great job. We’re going to reward you with pizza and beer.

(3) Consistent: Always doing things the same way

She’s very consistent with her reports. They’re always of high quality.

Today’s

Questions

1. What are game dynamics?

a. Motivation caused by a game like feeling.

b. The rules of a game.

c. The changing nature of business.

2. How is school like a game?

a. You can win.

b. There are many rules.

c. There are points and levels.

3. How can you use game dynamics in your personal life?

a. For relaxation.

b. Create personal games that motivate you.

c. In order to persuade your family.

7________________________

Personal Growth Sunday

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video game player

By Jeremy Schaar

So much of personal growth is about personal motivation. It’s not that we don’t know what we need to do, it’s that we don’t do it.

This week on Stuart Mill English, it’s going to be all about game dynamics. Today, you’ll learn what game dynamics are and how you might use them to grow personally. As the week goes on, I’ll give more details on what game dynamics are. You’ll learn how they can be used in different business areas and we’ll also check out one of my favorite videos about game dynamics.

But first, what are game dynamics? A dynamic is something that motivates action. Games, you know, are things that we can play. Game dynamics are things that motivate action in life because they are like games.

An example of a game dynamic might be “getting points.” In a video game, you might get points for collecting stars. You’re motivated to get more stars because you get points for them A real life example of a game dynamic is grades at school. You get an A, B, C, D, or F. And you collect points on quizzes, tests, and homework. Your ultimate position is determined not just by yourself, but in a competition with your classmates.

What does this mean for personal growth? You can motivate yourself by creating game dynamics in your life.

Here are some ideas:

Give yourself a reward for being consistent. For example, if you wake up each morning during the week before 6am, you can have donuts for breakfast on Sunday.

Give yourself points for an action. For example, every time you study English, you give yourself a star. Once you get 10 stars, you can have an easy study session–like watching a movie.

Create a time dynamic. For example, if you go to the gym between 7am and 8am, then you can leave on time. But if you go during any different time, then you should work out 10 minutes longer.

These game dynamics are great ways to motivate ourselves to become stronger. So how about you? What game dynamic might you try in your life?

Want more practice? Got questions? Comment on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter.

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

A, C, B

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Personal Growth Sunday: Goals #2

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) To keep your mouth shut: To not speak

Keep your mouth shut about the birthday party. I want it to be a surprise.

(2) Conventional wisdom: Normal thinking, popular opinion

The conventional wisdom says you have to go to college if you want a good job.

(3) To hold someone to something: To make someone do what they promise

If you say you can complete the work by June that’s great. But I’m going to hold you to it. Don’t be late.

Today’s

Questions

1. What happens when you tell someone your goals?

a. You’re motivated.

b. You feel good.

c. That’s the first step towards accomplishing them.

2. In the study, which people worked harder?

a. The ones who told their goals.

b. The ones who didn’t tell their goals.

c. The ones with realistic goals.

3. How should you talk about your goals?

a. In ways that make you feel smart.

b. In ways that make you feel energetic.

c. In ways that make you feel bad.

7________________________

Personal Growth Sunday

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By Jeremy Schaar

Personal Growth: Goal Setting #2

Here’s a link to the first lesson on goal setting.

Last week we also talked about making goals. We learned that goals motivate us and that they help us stay focused. We saw that some people think goals should be realistic so that you can achieve them, but others felt goals should be unrealistic so that you can achieve even more.

Today’s video is by Derek Silver. He argues you should not tell people your goals.

In the first part of the video, Derek asks the audience to think of a goal and imagine telling it to someone. He says that just telling the goal feels good.

However, he then surprises us by explaining that that “telling someone your goal makes it less likely to happen.” Telling someone your goal creates a “social reality.” This feels good, but because it feels good already, then you’re less likely to work on the goal. He doesn’t give an example, but let me help.

Imagine you tell someone that you’re going to lose weight–say 5lbs (or 2kg). You’ll need to exercise and eat less, but because you’ve told someone your goal, that means you might not exercise and eat less. That’s why you should keep your mouth shut.

This is surprising, right? We think that we should tell our friends our goals so that they hold us to them. But that’s not right at all. The conventional wisdom is wrong.

In the next part of the video, he explains a study. Basically, scientists had some people say their goals. Those people didn’t work so hard. The scientists also had other people keep their mouths shut about their goals. Those people worked harder.

At the end, he gives some advice. He says, don’t tell people your goals. However, if you do tell them your goals, make sure it’s not satisfying to tell the goal. Talk about how hard it will be so that you feel bad telling it. That’ll make you more likely to succeed.

Want more practice? Got questions? Comment on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter.

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

B, B, C

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Personal Growth Sundays–Goals

Watch

On YouTube

YouTubeLink

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Measurable: You can check the amount of it.

Testing makes teaching a measurable profession.

(2) Unrealistic: Not likely, probably not possible

It’s unrealistic to think we’ll gain 30% market share in our first year.

(3) Vague: Unclear

He gave a vague speech on improving sales or something. Actually, I’m not sure what he was talking about.

Today’s

Questions

1. Why are goals good?

a. They inspire and are measurable.

b. They motivate and focus.

c. They help concentration and get results.

2. Why should a goal be specific and measurable?

a. So you’ll know when you succeed.

b. So that it’s motivating.

c. So you can get a raise.

3. Why does Jack Welch encourage unrealistic goals?

a. They give you good ideas.

b. To help employees do great things.

c. You can get $1,000,000.

7________________________

Personal Growth Sunday

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200px-Commons-emblem-success

By Jeremy Schaar

Personal Growth: Goal Setting.

Do you make goals for yourself? How about for your employees? Today, I’ll discuss the advantages of making goals, discuss how to make good goals, and introduce some good vocabulary too.

So why is it good to make goals?

In short, goals are motivating and they help us stay focused.

Goals are motivating. If we don’t feel like we’re going anywhere specific, we’re less likely to work hard. Everyone likes to be able to see good things in their future. Goals should be those good things. On a personal level, your career might advance when you meet a goal. Like, if you hit a sales number, then you’ll be considered for a promotion. On a company level, teams feel great when they complete something together.

And goals help us stay focused. For example, if you just think a little bit about becoming a better cook, it will never happen. A goal, such as I’m going to cook every day for one month, will focus you on actually getting better.

Next question: How can we make a good goal?

The first thing is that it needs to be specific and measurable. “I’m going to cook everyday for one month” is a great goal. I can check that. “I’m going to become a better cook” is bad. What does “better cook” mean. How can you know you’ve been successful? The same thing goes for work. Specific, measurable goals work. Vague ideas don’t.

Next up is that goals should be related to your values. Here at Stuart Mill, my goal is to help people learn English. My value is education. It doesn’t help me to say, let’s make a lot of money. It should be: let’s really help people learn Business English. (And hopefully money will follow.)

Now, normally in articles about goals, the writer or speaker will finish by telling you that goals should be realistic. I think that’s good advice, but not always. At GE, Jack Welch also had people set unrealistic goals. He wanted people to dream. He wanted them to do great things. Unrealistic goals can take you to a new place. So, yes, set realistic goals, but don’t be afraid to dream big. If you don’t, you’ll never be great.

Want some more study? Here are two great links: On Jack Welch’s leadership On the importance of motivation in goal setting.

Want more practice? Got questions? Comment on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter.

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

B, A, B

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Personal Growth Sundays

Watch

On YouTube

YouTubeLink

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) To pass on: To give something to someone after someone else gave it to you.

Let me pass on some advice that my father gave me. Find something you love to do and get someone to pay you for it.

(2) Workaholic: Someone who is addicted to work.

If you work more than 12 hours a day I think that means you’re a workaholic.

(3) To put your nose down in something: This means to think about just one thing for a long time.

If you want to pass the test, you’ll have to put your nose down into that book and study.

Today’s

Questions

1. Why is it important to focus?

a. That way you’ll be more interested.

b. Without focus someone has to push you.

c. If you don’t focus, you’ll work on other things.

2. Why are pushy mothers helpful?

a. Sometimes you want to quit. They make you keep working.

b. They give you good ideas.

c. They make sure you are damn good.

3. Why is it important to serve?

a. It gives you good ideas.

b. People only pay for things that serve them.

c. You can get $1,000,000.

7________________________

Personal Growth Sunday

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By Jeremy Schaar

Today’s video is Richard St. John’s 8 Secrets of Success. I really loved this video because he’s funny and I think he has great ideas. Actually, many of the eight things are similar or related to each other, but that’s OK. They’re very useful and I’m sure if you do them, you’ll be a successful person.

In the beginning he explains that he was on a plane and a kid asked him how to be successful. He then interviewed a lot of successful people. Here’s what he learned about how to be successful.

You need passion. This means you should do something that you love to do. Do it for love not for money and the money will come anyway.

You have to work hard. This means that if you want to be successful, you need to work a lot.

Number three is good. To get “damn good” at something means to become very good at something.

Focus is number four. Of course it’s very important to work on one thing. Don’t get distracted. Don’t do other things.

Number five is push yourself. Or you can have your mother push you. Either way, someone should make you work harder.

The sixth thing is to serve something of value. This means that people should want what you do. Otherwise they won’t pay for it. He gives the example of a doctor.

Ideas are number seven. You should have good ideas in order to be successful.

Finally, persist. He makes a joke and says you should persist through crap. Crap means “bad things” and the bad things he mentions here are criticism, rejection, assholes, and pressure.”

Want more practice? Got questions? Comment on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter.

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

C, A, B

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

Personal Growth Sundays

Today’s

Vocabulary

(1) Aha!: Say this after you have a good idea.

Aha! I know the solution!.

(2) To chill: To relax

You need to take a vacation and just chill for a while. You’re working too hard.

(3) Insight: A good understanding of something

The conference gave me a great insight into the future of the industry.

Today’s

Questions

1. What topics will Personal Growth Sundays present?

a. How to improve yourself.

b. How to get a raise.

c. Where to go on vacation.

2. How does the article suggest you solve difficult problems?

a. Don’t stop working until you find the solution.

b. Take a break, then you’ll have an “Aha! Moment”.

c. Ask for help.

3. The article asks what to do when a problem won’t “yield”. What do you think “yield” means?

a. Survive.

b. Die.

c. Give up, let go.

7________________________

Personal Growth Sundays

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personalgrowth

By Jeremy Schaar

Welcome to the very first “Personal Growth Sundays” lesson. On Sundays, let’s take a break from thinking about business and think about you instead. What skills can you develop that will help you at work and home? In these lessons, I’ll present you with articles, videos, and other things that can help you help yourself.

Some questions we might think about here:

  • How can you lead people better?
  • How can you get people to say yes?
  • How can you be more creative?
  • How can you learn new skills?

And more.

Today, let’s think about how you can have better insights. (What’s an insight? Look in Today’s Vocabulary for a definition and explanation.)

Here’s an article that might help you. The title is “Chill, You’ll Have More Aha! Moments”.

What is an “Aha! moment”? In English, we say “Aha!” when we think of a good idea–like a solution to a problem. The article suggests that rather than working and working and working on a problem, that you should just relax. If you do, then you’ll think of  good solutions. What do you think? If you ignore a problem, will the solution come to you?

Want more practice? Got questions? Comment on the blog, Facebook, or Twitter.

CHECK YOUR ANSWERS!

Answers To Today’s Questions

A, B, C

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You Can Do It All Yourself But You Dont Have To

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