TED Talk Lesson Plans Introduction

This is an introduction to a series of lesson plans using TED Videos.

Who are the lessons for? Lessons were designed for one-on-one sessions where the student has good English but problems talking with native speakers. But they’re easily adaptable for lots of uses.

What’s the goal? Improve advanced listening and speaking skills.

How long is the lesson? You’ll likely need 3-5 hours, ideally spread out over several weeks, to do everything. You can do it quick or slow depending on the student’s level, goals, and time.

What should the student’s level be? Upper-intermediate to Advanced

Some thoughts on how to use the lessons…

Take your time. You might spend several weeks to complete all the discussions.

Emphasize to students that they should watch the video without subtitles several times before using English or native language subtitles and/or the transcript to help their understanding.

They should also watch the video many times in total. Repetition is helpful.

Send the students the questions before you talk about them.

Don’t do the lessons in consecutive weeks. Do lessons on other stuff too.

Example Timeline for Four 1-hour Lessons

During the Lesson: Discuss “Before you watch…” questions.

Homework: 1) Watch the video 2) First set of detail questions 3) Writing homework

During the Lesson: 1) Discuss the first set of detail questions 2) Review the writing homework 3) Discuss the first set of follow-up questions.

Homework: 1) Second set of detail questions 2) Reading homework.

During the Lesson: 1) Discuss the second set of detail questions 2) Review the reading homework 3) Discuss the second set of follow-up questions

Homework: 1) Third set of detail questions 2) Speaking homework

During the Lesson: 1) Discuss the third set of detail questions 2) Review the speaking homework 3) Discuss the third set of follow-up questions

Homework: None

Thoughts on how to adapt the lessons

All this is easily adaptable.

To make it shorter, just delete stuff. At its simplest, you might just do one set of detail questions.

For a class, pass out different questions to different students. They should find answers to their own questions and then ask a partner.

Leave a Reply